Backpacking Iran: Yadz

We arrived at 6.30am on our bus from Shiraz and our kind bus driver helped our half asleep selves to get a taxi taking us to hostel in old quarter to our hostel. The hostel we stayed in was another absolute jackpot- it was beautiful with the rooms situated around a main courtyard, and we got a private room for only $10 USD including a buffet persian breakfast every morning, including carrot jam (I have no self control around buffet breakfasts, I was in heaven). After breakfast we went on a walking tour organised by a local hotel which showed us around the old quarter of the city and gave us some insight into Yadz.

Yazd is a city of the desert with its old quarter being a labyrinth of winding lanes, mud-brick houses all joined at their roofs to make it possible for a quick get-away from an enemy.

Yadz is recognised by UNESCO as one of the oldest towns on earth originally settled 5000 years ago, and was once an important stop on the Silk Road- Marco Polo once stopped in Yadz around 1270AD called it “good and noble city”. Remnants of its past as a silk road stop can be seen in multiple features of the city, for example, in the minarets adjoining the mosques where they used to light fires in the large balconies to guide travellers towards them for food and shelter.

We explored a beautiful local mosque in the late afternoon, after sheltering from the 45 degree midday sun in our hostel (in front of the air conditioner!).

Our next day, after another buffet breakfast, we sluggishly headed out to one of the top tripadvisor sights for Yadz- the water museum. It sounds like a strange place to go to but we could not work out how this city in the middle of the desert survived for 5000 years with no nearby river or lakes. I won’t go into all the details but in summary it involved a complex underground aquaduct system moving water from mountains afar to the city which they think were first built 2000 years ago (now modern water systems are in place). We learnt that now Yadz is running out of water, the rivers that once supplied that city have gone almost dry and the city is having to get water from far away cities to supply its population.

Another amazing sight in Yadz, you can see the minarets in the back and the balconies at the top were they would light the fires to guide silk road travellers

We walked (foolishly) in the midday heat to a Zoroastrian fire temple about 3 km from the centre of town. The brick temple contains a fire that has burned for more than 1,500 years. The ancient flame has been kept alive since and relocations, and continues to burn today. The fire was first lit in 470 and has had two other cities as its home before settling where it is today.

About the Zoroastrian symbol
Chris and the very old fire (kept behind glass inside the temple)

We just about passed out from the heat on the way back only to be saved by copious water and the humble soft serve ice cream sold to us by a nice man on the street. We probably could have called it a day then but we had one more sight in Yadz we had to see- The Towers of Silence.

The towers of silence are the two building you can see on the hills in the background

The Towers of Silence, built more than a millenia ago, is the old Zoroastrian cemetery where until 1960s the bodies of the deceased were transported to their final resting place and left to the vultures. In the Zoroastrian belief contaminating the elements (Earth, Air, Fire and Water) with decaying matter such as a corpse is considered sacrilege. Sky burial is considered a clean death because it prevents putrefaction—bodies are exposed to the sun and birds of prey such as vultures can eat a body down to the bones in just a few hours. To me it sounds like a gruesome way to go having grown up in a different belief system, however I can see how it fits in within the Zoroastrian religion. Information at the sight also stated that this way of handling the deceased helped for sanitation “it is said that in case of spreading diseases such as cholera, typhoid, plague, or when large wars broke out, a large number of people were killed in one day and burying the corpses were a big challenge so they used sky burial to prevent disease from spreading.

Since it was disused as a burial site (less than 50 years ago) it has become a local and international tourist spot.

Inside the tower
I did not like being in the towers, I just got a yuck feeling and I left pretty quickly out of them
View from the hill one of the towers is on of Yadz, the towers used to be far out of town but now with the expanding city it is much closer

That evening we had dinner above the city in one of the rooftop restaurants with an amazing view.

The next day we did a tour to Kharanaq, Chak Chak, and Meybod.

We first visited the crumbling mud-brick village of Kharanaq. The site has been occupied for approximately 4,000 years, while the rundown adobe buildings that draw foreigners from around the world date back around 1,000 years.  

The village of Chak Chak, also known as Pir’e Sabz, consists of a Zoroastrian Fire Temple perched beneath a towering cliff face in the desert out of Yadz.

We were a little disappointed at the tea lights supposed to be the fire shire in the temple after slogging up the hill in 40 degree heat

Finally we hit Meybod village where we saw an old castle ruin, a caravanserai dating back to the silk road, and the ice house which was definiately the best part. The ice house is a domed, thick wall structure where ice was stored during the winter months and enjoyed during the hot summers, basically it was a massive freezer.

empty pool outside the ice house, in winter these were filled every day with water and then the ice from the frozen pool was cut up and stored inside the ice house for summer
in the ice house

That afternoon we took a 5 hour bus north to our next destination- Isfahan…

Highlights of Yadz:

  • Free walking tour
  • Walking through the old quarter
  • The beautiful mosques
  • The water museum
  • Zoroastrian fire temple
  • Temple of Silence
  • Meybod Ice house

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